Introduction to Conditional Logic and Triggers

By default, all steps progress chronologically to the next number (1 leads to 2, 2 to 3, and 33 to 34, etc.) However, there are times when it may be valuable to override this behavior. 

For example, we might want to route users to different steps depending on whether they select "Yes" or "No", or whether they enter a number that is out of our desired range.

Using the Actions tab in the right-side panel, authors have the ability to override the default behavior.


Types of Logic

There are four different types of logic in the Actions tab.

  1. Go to next step (Default)
  2. Jump to
  3. Conditional
  4. End checklist


1. Go to next step (Default)

This option is the default behavior of every step. It simply means that after this step is completed, the headset user will move on to the step number immediately following it.


2. Jump to

This option allows checklist authors to designate a specific step to skip to upon completion of the selected step. 

Jump to's are typically used to reconnect a branch of your checklist back to its main flow. For example, Tom the Technician may have been redirected to an optional section of a checklist because on Step 5, when asked about whether an important sensor was set up, he indicated "No". After completing the detour section about setting up the missing sensor, Tom needs to continue back where he left off. So, on the last step of the detour section, there needs to be "Jump to" logic redirecting him back to Step 6.

To set up Jump to logic:

  1. Select the desired step on which you wish to add logic, and click the Actions tab in the right panel
  2. In the dropdown menu, select Jump to
  3. Then in the second dropdown, click the step you wish to jump to

In the example above, the default action would be that Step 1 progresses onto Step 2. Due to the Jump To Action, this step will now skip Step 2 and progress directly from Step 1 to Step 3.


3. Conditional

This option allows checklist authors to create branching paths in their checklists. With this tool, you can trigger different actions based on the inputs of your headset users. 

For example, Tom the Technician may be asked to input the temperature reading of a particular safety sensor on Step 8... If the temperature is below a certain threshold, you may want to redirect Tom to an otherwise optional series of steps that inform him how to adjust the temperature higher. If the temperature is within a certain range, you may want to simply allow Tom to continue on with the checklist as normal. If the temperature is above a certain threshold, you may want to immediately inform Tom to stop what he's doing, end the checklist there, and mark it as Noncompliant.

To create conditional logic, use the dropdowns in the Actions tab to form a logical statement like the following:

If   [Step's input]   [is]   [less than]   [100],
Then   [Jump to a step].

  1. Select the desired step on which you wish to add logic, and click the Actions tab in the right panel
  2. In the first dropdown menu, select Conditional
  3. Then in the section titled If, select either = or != (is not equal) to continue your statement
  4. Use the Then section to choose which action will occur should the previous statement be true
  5. Finally, the Otherwise... section enables you to select what occurs if the previous If condition was not satisfied. Here, you can have it Go to next step (default), Jump to Step, End Checklist, or even add another Conditional logic statement. 

In the example above, the Comparison statement begins by looking to see if the answer to Step 2 is equal to yes. If so, Then the checklist will automatically Jump to step 4. If that is not the case— meaning the answer to Step 2 is equal to no— then the checklist will continue onto the next step by default.

It's important to note that if there are multiple conditions present:

  • If a condition is true, none of the subsequent conditions will be evaluated
  • If a Jump To action is present, none of the subsequent conditions or actions will be evaluated, as the application has already jumped to the next step!


4. End Checklist

Typically, a checklist will only end after the last step has been completed, or if the headset user has indicated that there was an issue. However in some cases, you may want to force a checklist to end depending on the input of the headset user.

For example, Tom the Technician may indicate that the pressure value of a sensor is much higher than normal, and therefore should not continue with his normal maintenance procedure. In such a case, you may want to end the checklist right there.

The End Checklist Action will terminate a checklist before the end of the authored steps. Once this action is triggered, the checklist will terminate and be marked as compliant or non-compliant based on what the author designates.

To create an End Checklist action:

  1. Select the desired step on which you wish to add logic, and click the Actions tab in the right pane
  2. In the dropdown menu, select End Checklist
  3. Then in the second dropdown, select whether the checklist should be marked as Compliant or Non Compliant

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